5 Things NOT To Do With Online Art

So you know what to do with art that you like. What shouldn’t you do, then?

Here’s a quick list of what you probably shouldn’t do with art you find online and why.

  1. Take art without permission

The number one peeve of all artists. Nothing annoys us more than seeing our art under someone else’s name. Sometimes, it adds insult to injury when someone’s re-post is more popular than our own. Taking art without permission just tells the artist that people don’t care about an artist’s rights as a person and that the thief didn’t care much about a simple common courtesy like asking politely.

2. Criticise the art

It sounds a little counter-productive, but there’s a reason why the ‘sensitive artist’ stereotype exists. It doesn’t matter if you call it an effort to help the artist improve, uncalled criticism can still hurt the self-esteem that nurtures great art. Sometimes artists will ask what their audience enjoys about their art and where they may need improvement, but like all criticism, no one wants to hear it when they don’t want it.

3. Ridicule the art

You’ve heard of the blogs that make fun of art that people have found online. It’s straight up bullying and degradation of an artist. Not fun at all.

4. Attack the artist for the content

Art is an expression of the self. It’s also an exploration of aspects of the mind, so naturally there will be disturbing forms of art that exist. Creating explicit art can be seen as a healthier expression of the mind rather than an actual performance, though it stands to reason for there to be sufficient barriers and warnings in place. Telling an artist directly about how their art is problematic or why the content is wrong is likely preaching to a choir. An unimpressed choir at that too. However, a polite discussion of the content of the work can lead to an understanding on possibly overseen aspects of art that could be potentially hurtful. Always treat an artist with respect.

5. False accusations of plagiarism

No one likes this, and it only serves to cause drama that is easily spread around and misinterpreted. It may also hurt the artist’s future prospects of work, so false accusations of anything are a really low blow.

The less respect an artist receives from their audience, the less likely they will continue creating art. Protecting artists is a reflection of society and culture.

–VZ

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